Can Your Body Really Only Absorb Up To 30 Grams of Protein Per Meal?

You here people all the time tell you that the body is not capable of absorbing more than 30 grams of protein per meal.  You see supplement companies push this as well, which is why most Whey Protein powders serving per scoop has 30 grams or less protein.  Will the excess protein you consume per meal really turn into fat?
NOOOOOOOOOO!

I am currently reading the book, “The 4 Hour Body.”  “Research done in France found that eating protein all at once can be just as well absorbed as spreading it out over your day (30 grams per meal).  “A group of 26-year-old women were given either 80% of their protein for the day at one meal or spread over multiple meals.  After two weeks, there was no difference between the subject and control groups in terms of nitrogen balance, whole-body protein turnover, whole-body synthesis, or protein breakdown.” (p. 191)

In both subjects and controls, the amount was 1.7 grams of protein per kilogram of fat-free mass per day.  Meaning a 26-year-old, 125 pound woman, eating 77 grams of protein in one meal had the same effects as spreading it out throughout the day.  BAM!

In conclusion Daily protein intake is more important than per-meal protein.

Now it’s safe to say that this experiment may not have yielded enough 26-year-old women to back up their information but these same researchers repeated this practice with elderly women and the results were the same.

Now say your a 200 pound dude looking to put on muscle.  If you stick to the 30 grams of protein per meal you are gonna have to eat like 7 meals to get all your protein in.  Who the hell wants to do that!?

“A good rule of thumb for daily intake, and a safe range based on the literature, is 0.8-2.5 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight.  For muscular gain, I suggest at least 1.25 grams per pound of current lean bodyweight, which means you subtract your bodyfat first.  (p. 191)

EX:

100lbs of lean mass= 125 grams of protein

110 lbs = 137.5 g

150 lbs = 197.5 g

200 lbs = 250 g

And so on…

Source:

Ferriss, T (2010).  “The 4-Hour Body.”

JORDAN ANDERSON

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